Measurement of engergy losses in building

Energy losses of building walls

The construction building wall makes the most significant contribution to the reduction of building energy consumption. The total thermal losses of building constructions strongly depends on the environmental conditions (Location) and building construction (Material). On site measurements are possible with EKO thin film heat flow sensors which can be integrated with building walls. Evaluation of heat flow and thermal losses is inevitable during building design and engineering of energy-efficient floor heating systems.

MF heatflux sensors

The MF-series heatflux sensors are perfectly suited for optimization of thermal building efficiency reserach. Since sensor foils are relatively flexible those can easy be applied on curved surfaces. The sensors are suitable for indoors applications, some models made for outdoors purposes and are available in different sizes and thickness. All sensors are extremely flat, which is a big advantage considering the minimum interference with the conditions of the testing area.

HOW-TO Application Guide

1

Suitable sensors

Select the right heatflow sensor. A smaller sensor can be selected when the surface space is limited. A larger sensor can be choosen when the surface size allows and the surface structure or heat distribution is less uniform. All sensors are extremely flat, which is a big advantage considering the minimum interference with the conditions of the testing area the thermal dynamics. 

2

Thermal conductivity

For In situ measurements heat flow sensors can be integrated. When the sensor is put at the top of a surface the thermal conductivity, thermal transmission, radiation and convection component are measured. When the sensor is placed in between to surfaces inside the object it measures the thermal transmission by means of thermal conduction.

3

Thermal contact

If a heat flux sensor does not make good thermal contact with the material to be measured, it will cause a local hot spot to form (or a cold spot in the case where the heat flux is negative). This hot spot will alter thermal gradients and change the convective and conductive heat transfer coefficients. Flat, layered sensors are usually mounted with a thermally conductive adhesive to minimize contact resistance. Simply butting a sensor against a surface may still result in a heat flux reading, but the contact resistance will keep the reading from being particularly meaningful.